postheadericon Djokovic Shrugs Off Talks of Boycott Over Prize Money

Novak Djokovic, six-time Australian Open champion, has dissociated himself from rumours that he called for players to boycott the 2019 tournament unless the prize money was increased.

Media reports have said that the 30-year old Serbian, who also holds the position of president of the Player’s Council, was pushing for a rebellion over the way in which the revenues from the four Grand Slams are being distributed.

Reports also suggested that Djokovic demanded that officials from the Association of Tennis Professionals, the ATP, which is in charge of the Men’s Tour but not the Grand Slams, and Tennis Australia, leave a player’s meeting which took place on Friday.

Djokovic Sets the Record Straight

 When asked if he had threatened a boycott, the former world number one said that he had not and that it was a myth, adding that not much of what had been written was true, in fact. He stated that what had actually occurred was that the players simply wanted to discuss certain topics on their own, and added that he didn’t feel there was anything unhealthy in that, seeing as this was one place where they were all able to come together.

Nobody Was Thrown Out

 Djokovic said that the players wanted to use the opportunity to talk about certain things, and ascertain how everyone felt about these, and mentioned that no decisions were made, adding that at no point did anyone mention anything about boycotting.

Djokovic has won 12 Grand Slam singles titles, as punters who enjoy the betting NZ has to offer will well know, and further made it clear that no ATP officials had been thrown out of the meeting, and that there was no lawyer present. He stated that everything had been done normally, politely, and that the players simply wanted privacy. He finished off by saying there were about 100 players there, that they got to talking about what they wanted to talk about, and that that was all.

Reports Also Say That a Union Was Discussed

 The reports have also stated that the players were discussing the possibility of creating a union that would operate independently of the ATP, which would represent their concerns overall and assist in the push for a larger share of the prize money.

The ATP was established in 1972, and is jointly owned by the tournaments and the players.

Djokovic, however, stated that nothing regarding unions had been discussed, even though the former world number one, American Andy Roddick, had taken to social media in support of the idea.

Roddick released a tweet stating that the union has been a good idea for a while now, since it was impossible for an entity to represent both sides in any kind of negotiation. He ended his tweet by sharing his amazement that this concept was not being discussed more often.

Players who are at the Australian Open have been unwilling to discuss the issue, but Kevin Anderson, vice president for the Players’ Council, did confirm that talks about prize money allocation had taken place, and that the focus was on helping players who were lower down in the ranks make a better living from playi

Comments are closed.